How to take care of your skin in autumn?

Monday, August 8, 2022





The demand for skin care products increases when the temperature drops. We must get ready if we don't want dry, cracked skin. The season of autumn offers numerous advantages for our skin: The skin does not have to defend itself as vigorously and does not age as quickly since UV light is less intense than in the summer. Sadly, there are drawbacks as well, such as dry heated air and cold, which cause dry, irritated skin.




The demand for skin care products increases when the temperature drops. We must get ready if we don't want dry, cracked skin. The season of autumn offers numerous advantages for our skin: The skin does not have to defend itself as vigorously and does not age as quickly since UV light is less intense than in the summer. Sadly, there are drawbacks as well, such as dry heated air and cold, which cause dry, irritated skin.

What are AHA & BHA acids in skincare?

Tuesday, August 2, 2022

 
Woman holding a skincare product


Are you wondering what AHA and BHA stand for on your skincare products? 

They have long been used for cosmetic purposes; Cleopatra bathed in milk, Polynesian women softened their skin with concoctions of fruit juices and sugar cane, and French courtesans applied wine poultices to their faces for flawless, blemish-free skin. AHA and BHA acids have also been used for many years in dermatology to treat a variety of skin conditions, including acne, psoriasis, and other forms of keratosis.

Alpha (AHA) and beta (BHA) hydroxy acids are best used for skin care in the fall and winter when the sun's rays are less intense. In their natural state, hydroxy acids are present in a variety of foods that we consume every day. Examples include salicylic acid, which is present in black currants, apricots, willow bark, and evergreen trees, as well as glycolic acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, and citric acid. (Photo by Mikhail Nilov)

 
Woman holding a skincare product


Are you wondering what AHA and BHA stand for on your skincare products? 

They have long been used for cosmetic purposes; Cleopatra bathed in milk, Polynesian women softened their skin with concoctions of fruit juices and sugar cane, and French courtesans applied wine poultices to their faces for flawless, blemish-free skin. AHA and BHA acids have also been used for many years in dermatology to treat a variety of skin conditions, including acne, psoriasis, and other forms of keratosis.

Alpha (AHA) and beta (BHA) hydroxy acids are best used for skin care in the fall and winter when the sun's rays are less intense. In their natural state, hydroxy acids are present in a variety of foods that we consume every day. Examples include salicylic acid, which is present in black currants, apricots, willow bark, and evergreen trees, as well as glycolic acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, and citric acid. (Photo by Mikhail Nilov)